Hair Fashion or Bait ?

There is a feather frenzy going on, maybe because "American Idol" judge and rocker Steven Tyler, wears feathers in his long hair.
But, fly-fishing shops nationwide are at the center of this latest trend: Feather extensions. Supplies at stores from the coasts of Maine to landlocked Idaho are running out and some feathers sold online are fetching hundreds of dollars more than the usual prices.
Fly fishermen are not happy, bemoaning the trend in online message boards and sneering at so-called "feather ladies.
The feathers are not easy to come by in the first place. They come from roosters that are genetically bred and raised for their plumage. In most cases, the birds do not survive the plucking. At Whiting Farms, Inc., in western Colorado, one of the world's largest producers of fly tying feathers, the roosters live about a year while their saddle feathers — the ones on the bird's backside and the most popular for hair extensions — grow as long as possible. Then the animal is euthanized.
As hair extensions, the feathers can be brushed, blow dried, straightened and curled once they are snapped into place. Most salons sell the feather strands for $5 to $10 a piece. It's not uncommon to find a package of rooster saddle feathers that would have cost around $60 at a fly shop now priced from $200 to $400. A package of the most popular fly tying hackle for hair extensions, a black and white striped feather called grizzly saddle, would normally retail anywhere from $40 to $60. It sold for $480 on eBay last month after 31 bids.
`Why would you get feathers in your hair?'" I get it...a fashion trend, but at the expense of the rooster’s life?

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